Archive for 2015

Summer Reads: The Counterfeit Family Tree of Vee Crawford-Wong

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In this, the second in the series of summer reads for teens, we have this absolutely fun novel that is also the debut novel of author Lindsay Tam Holland.

Like the previous book, our teen protagonist (sixteen-year-old Vee) has to investigate his family. Which is a bit of a mission since his Chinese Dad and Texan mother never talk about themselves, so the homework sucks, and Vee hates that he doesn't know much about his family. Its as if his father never had a life before going to the USA: Vee says:

"I hated my life. I hated brainless, cruel homework and the way I was supposed to figure out everything on my own. Other kids would have tough life stories: single parents, divorced parents, alcoholic parents, abusive parents, dead parents, all of the above. They'd be coddled and cooed over and given A's just for telling the truth. I wanted to tell the truth, I did, but there was no truth to tell. there was just this nothingness, this silence."

To make matters more interesting, Vee's best friend is Chinese and she does have a story to tell.
The novel chart's Vee's mission to find out the truth about both sets of grandparents, and includes along with it some good old angst, love interests, your basic teen confusion, and life as a kid of mixed parentage.

And of course he does find out the truth about his family although when his father tells him how he came to America, its not quite what Vee had imagined:

"The whole time I'd wondered in the back of my mind if he'd sneaked into America by hiding in some cramped cargo hold for months on end, or by bribing a high-level official, or by drifting the way Cubans do in a boat the size of a bathtub. Madison's family with their false papers and grueling interrogations were more interesting than Dad's immigration. His trip sounded about as exciting and difficult as an excursion to 7-Eleven."

You can check out the book on the library catalogue here. Like all great YA novels, there's no reason why folks well and truly into adulthood shouldn't read them. Take no notice of those critics who say reading young is beneath you!

For more info on Lindsay Tam Holland. Check out her website.

I sure hope she's writing another book because The Counterfeit Family Tree of Vee Crawford-Wong is a winner.

And have a great reading-filled 2016, everyone!

Joanne

Treasure chest Thursday: New CD Roms to the Central Research Centre

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Our filing cabinets in the Research Centre are real treasure chests, filled with microfiche, microfilm and CDs and DVDs.


Photograph of the 'S S Viti' of the
Tasman Shipping Company Ltd
(Captain Clough Blair)
Heritage Images, Sir George Grey Special Collections,
Auckland Libraries, 34-T284
CDs and DVDs contain useful databases on documents in pdf format that are keyword searchable. Parish registers, passenger lists, private hospital registers, memorial inscriptions and cemetery records to name but a few examples of what they contain.

Methodical searching through our almost 4000 CD collection can lead to all sorts of exciting discoveries.

New additions to our CD collections this month:

Australia
2 AUS DIR NSW
NSW Telephone Directory, Section 5, Western Districts, 1958

2 AUS DIR VIC

2 AUS IMM
Arrivals at Moreton Bay, Port Phillip, Sydney and Twofold Bay

2 AUS SHI QLD

2 AUS PUB NSW
(5/5857) - (5/5860), compiled by Teapot Genealogy, Kaye Vernon and Billie Jacobsen

England
4 ENG BDM ESS

4 ENG BDM NTT

4 ENG BDM NTT

4 ENG BDM NTT

4 ENG BDM LNC

4 ENG BDM SAL

4 ENG BDM SAL

4 ENG BDM YKS

4 ENG CHR HAM

4 ENG DIR WAR

Scotland
4 SCT CEM AYR

United States
6 USA GAZ


Happy hunting

Seonaid

Family History Reading for the Young Ones

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Auckland Libraries' holiday reading programme for the kids, Dare to Explore, is on again over the Kiwi summer, and it’s a great opportunity to spread your reading wings and try something a little different – like books for young people.

There are some fabulous family history-themed novels around for teens, so what better place to start my reading than with an excellent YA (Young Adult) New Zealand story – Finding Isabella.

Stacey Harper is a fourteen-year old girl living in a small North Island town with her brothers and mother. Her father has recently taken off to be with his new girlfriend, and Stacey’s supposed boyfriend Zac has taken up with Stacey’s supposed friend Lisa. So when our heroine has to do a family history project for school over the holidays, and her mother suggests she take a look at the impossible-to-read diary of a great-great-grandmother, Isabella, Stacey begrudgingly starts researching but is soon - family historians, you know this well! – totally hooked, as she sets about uncovering a story of love and scandal and family and society in 19th century England and New Zealand.

What’s to love about this story? So much. Apart from the family history angle, there’s snappy dialogue, Stacey is an extremely relatable teen (a lot of relatable teen stuff going on there, and let’s face it, not just teen-relatable). It’s a totally Kiwi read, from the vernacular language to the settings, to the culture, to scenes like the one where she visits her demented gran who accuses her of stealing. And as for the family history, there’s so much the family historian will smile at, as Stacey learns about BDMs, looking people up on microfiche, to the horror at the cost of Isabella’s birth certificate.
Yes, this is a teen book but honestly? I loved it. So if you want something to read while you're trying not to get burnt in the sun, give it a go.

Here's a random excerpt, from Stacey’s point of view:


“There’s a major flaw in growing up and growing old amongst the generations, I decided. The generation gap is too big. When old people have still got all their marbles and want to talk about their lives, the young aren’t interested – they’ve got too much happening right now. Then, by the time young people are interested, the oldies are even older and their minds are unhinged. There should be a better system.”

Well said, Stacey Harper.

There are several copies within the Auckland Libraries' system, so check it out here.
Enjoy.

Joanne - Central Research

Motivation Monday: Hoots Mon

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Those of you who have Scottish ancestry may be interested to know that two more Scottish related databases have been added to the Ancestry.com collection.

These are – Scotland, National Probate Index (Calendar of Confirmations and Inventories) 1876-1936 and Perth and Kinross, Scotland, Electoral Registers
1832-1961.  This is the first time that the confirmations and inventories have been made available other than on the Scotlands People website; however, you will need to visit Scotlands People site for wills prior to 1876.

So, what can you expect to find on these databases?

Calendar of Confirmations and Inventories – this can be browsed by year but if looking for a particular person/family use the search box.  As with other searches you can search using a surname only, Christian (first) name only and the wild cards are also available.  You do not need to enter a date of death, place of death etc but may do so if you want to reduce your number of “hits” (start with less detail and add to it as necessary).  The results page will give you a list of names of deceased, death date and place and confirmation date.  By clicking “View Record” you will get the place of Confirmation.  The best part is when you click on “View Images”, this gives you the following – name of deceased, occupation (mainly only men), address, date and place of death, whether testate or intestate (will or not), when and where Confirmation granted, names and addresses of executors, date of will and any codicils, date recorded in Court Books (if applicable) and lastly value of the estate.

An extract from the Calendar of Confirmations and Inventories on Ancestry

If you want a copy of the confirmation, inventory and/or will you will need to use the Scotlands People website.  You register (free) and then go to the index on their site and click on the button attached to your entry of interest.  A small fee is charged and you will receive a digitised copy of the documents.  Apart from the will, inventories can be very informative some more detailed than others but you will get some idea of household goods, bank accounts, debtors/creditors etc.  Do check these indexes for Scots dying outside of Scotland as well as if they had property in Scotland then probate would have also been granted in Scotland.

There is a guide to Scottish wills on both the Scotlands People and National Records of Scotland websites – these give detailed explanations of the process of probate.

Name:Angus Macleod
Year:1945
Country:Scotland
County:Perth and Kinross
Division or Location:Perth Division
Place of Abode:Ferguslca, Hay Street
An extract from the Perth and Kinross, Scotland, Electoral Registers 1832-1961 on Ancestry

Perth and Kinross, Scotland, Electoral Registers 1832-1961 – this collection can be searched by county (Kinross, Perth or Perth and Kinross).  Otherwise use the search box as described above. Electoral rolls from 1920 onwards appear to only give the name of the person, address and electoral district.  However, the earlier rolls give the following – electorate, name of voter, address, occupation, qualification to vote eg occupant of house, proprietor of house and shop etc, where property is situated.


Having these available will be a great advantage for research in Scotland especially if you are unable to visit Scotland yourself.

Marie Hickey

Sentimental Sunday: 100 Years of History and Schooling in Okoroire District 1914-2014

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This school history was recently received in the Central Auckland Research Centre for our Family History material collection.  It can be found at the shelf mark of 2 NZL SCH WKT.  The book is A4 in size and comprises 108 pages; the back cover has a current colour map of the district on which is marked properties with the name of the (presumably) current owner/occupant.



There are short articles relating to both local history and short family histories accompanied with photographs.  Photographs of ex-pupils attending the reunion have been included as have listings of the school rolls covering the 100 years.  As there was an amalgamation, there is also detail of Tapapa and Kurinui Schools.  Amongst the lists there is a Roll of Honour for World War II, teachers, chairpersons and secretaries.

This book will be of interest to anyone who has links to the area.

This is not the only school history in our collection so do check the catalogue to find out what we may have for your area interest.

Marie Hickey 

Travel Tuesday: 150th Commemoration of the Arrival of the S.S. Viola, Waikato Immigration Scheme

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A new title into the Central Auckland Research Centre recently is a book written to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the Waikato Immigration Scheme 1864-1865.

The book was published by the Clevedon and Districts Historical Society to coincide with the arrival of the Viola settlers, part of the Waikato Immigration Scheme.

Showing a stereoscopic view through trees of
All Souls Church, Clevedon

Heritage Images, Sir George Grey Special Collections,
Auckland Libraries, 4-8640

Title: 150th Commemoration of the Arrival of the S.S. Viola in April 1865, 29th March 2015: Commemorative Booklet
Author: Clevedon and Districts Historical Society
Subjects: Viola (Ship), Ships, Auckland, Passenger lists, Immigrants, Genealogy, Clevedon, History
Location: 2 NZL IMM AKD

Abstract from the book:

“In April 1865 a shipload of mainly Lowland Scots arrived in ignorance and hope into the depressed province of Auckland and into the depleted community of the Wairoa. They had come, recruited in advance before confiscation was even finalised, as part of the Northern Waikato Immigration Scheme. Under this scheme, two main inducements were offered to labourers and mechanics. The first was a free passage to Auckland, and free transport from Auckland to the settlement for every settler and his family. The second was free land to be surveyed at Government expense. A quarter or half-acre town grant would be given, plus a ten-acre suburban or rural grant. The immigrants were not allowed to absent themselves from the allotment and were to repay half their passage money in three years. The Viola was one of the last ships to arrive under this scheme,” – ‘Clevedon Sustainable Development Plan Project: European Historical Assessment’, p 36.


In the Research Centre, this book is reference only - but do look in our catalogue to find a borrowable near you


Happy hunting

Seonaid

Tuesday's Tip: Celebrating Niue

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E Faahi Tapu he Vagahau Niue 2015 
Niue Language Week 2015

This week is Niue language week and Auckland Libraries has a series of events on regionwide.

Showing the King and Queen of Niue with the 
New Zealand Premier, Richard Seddon and Mrs Seddon
Auckland Weekly News, 5 October 1900
Heritage Images Online, Sir George Grey Special Collections,
Auckland Libraries, AWNS-19001005-3-3

Here at Central Auckland Research Centre we're proud to be the caretakers of the microfilm copies of the Niue High Court Registrar records.

The original manuscripts were very badly damaged during Cyclone Heta in January 2004.

Fortunately, the Church of Jesus Christ of the Latter-Day Saints (Mormons) had microfilmed the precious records in the 1990s or the majority would have been lost. They were kind enough to gift a set of films to the Niuean government and also to Auckland Library (as Auckland has the largest population of Niueans in the world).

Since then, we've had many Niueans in our Research Centre happily researching their family heritage.

Examples of the major records we hold here are:

Birth registration records for Niue 1900-1997 (3 NIU BDM)

  • Microfilm of original manuscript in the custody of the Department of Justice, Tufukia Alofi, Niue.
  • Birth records for Niue.


Birth indexes (3 NIU BDM)

  • Microfilm of original manuscript in the custody of the Department of Justice, Tufukia Alofi, Niue.
  • Includes names, birth dates, and names of parents.  Arranged alphabetically by given name and includes an index number that refers to the appropriate birth record.
  • Villages: Alofi, Avatele, Fatiau, Hakupu, Hikutavake, Lakepa, Liku, Makefu, Mutalau, Namukulu, Tamakautonga, Toi, Tuapa, and Vaiea.


Death and still birth registration records 1899-1997 (3 NIU BDM)

  • Microfilm of original manuscript in the custody of the Department of Justice, Tufukia Alofi, Niue.
  • Death and still birth records for Niue.


Death indexes (3 NIU BDM)

  • Microfilm of original manuscript in the custody of the Department of Justice, Tufukia Alofi, Niue.
  • Includes names, birth dates, and names of parents of individuals who died or emigrated from Niue.  Arranged alphabetically by surname and includes an index number that refers to the appropriate death record.
  • Villages: Alofi, Avatele, Fatiau, Hakupu, Hikutavake, Lakepa, Liku, Makefu, Mutalau, Namukulu, Tamakautonga, Toi, Tuapa, and Vaiea.


Marriage registrations  (3 NIU BDM)

  • Microfilm of original manuscript in the custody of the Department of Justice, Tufukia Alofi, Niue.
  • Marriage records for Niue.


Various genealogies (3 NIU FAM)

  • Microfilm of original manuscript in the custody of the Department of Justice, Tufukia Alofi, Niue.
  • Includes genealogies of persons in Niue.  These were created at the request of people interested in tracing their ancestry or by people seeking to establish claims to citizenship or land ownership through inheritance.  Records contain copies of letters of request and conclusions of research in the form of family trees.


Genealogies of Niue women  (3 NIU FAM)

  • Microfilm of original manuscript in the custody of the Department of Justice, Tufukia Alofi, Niue.
  • Maternal genealogies arranged by village for use in determining property rights some of which inherited through maternal lines of descent.
  • Villages: Alofi, Avatele, Fatiau, Hakupu, Hikutavake, Lakepa, Liku, Makefu, Mutalau, Namukulu, Tamakautonga, Toi, Tuapa, and Vaiea.


Emigration from Niue (3 NIU IMM)

  • Microfilm of original manuscript in the custody of the Department of Justice, Tufukia Alofi, Niue.
  • Index of individuals who emigrated from Niue arranged by village.  Includes date of birth, name of parents, place of birth, date of emigration, place of emigration to, and if appropriate, date of return to Niue.
  • Villages: Alofi, Avatele, Fatiau, Hakupu, Hikutavake, Lakepa, Liku, Makefu, Mutalau, Namukulu, Tamakautonga, Toi, Tuapa, and Vaiea.


European immigration to Niue (3 NIU IMM)

  • Microfilm of original manuscript in the custody of the Department of Justice, Tufukia Alofi, Niue.
  • Index of europeans who immigrated to Niue, or who took up residence there. Includes names of their parents, place and date of birth, date immigrated, and if appropriate, date departed Niue or date of death.

Note: These records are copies of the original registers, and as they are not certified by the registrar-general they may not be acceptable for legal purposes.

Ki a monuina

Seonaid

Sentimental Sunday - The wonders of the City of Auckland’s 1908 map

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Friends of mine moved in to their new house recently, one of those established Ponsonby villas which has been done up with a garage put in. It has the same bones of its early 1900s self but with far less land than it would have originally been on.

It is in St Mary’s Road and it was an interesting exercise to explore the Auckland Council’s Archive to see if the property was on its City of Auckland’s 1908 map.

A simple google of Auckland Council Archives takes you straight to their home page and clicking on  Search the Archives takes you to the link to the map.

There are two different ways to search the City of Auckland’s 1908 map. One is by browsing; the other is by doing a keyword search. Using the keyword search we typed in St Mary's Road and up came the portion of the map with that particular street in it.


Once you have enlarged the map you will notice the blue pins.


My friend’s house on St Mary's Road has a blue pin, which we clicked on. This went straight to the 1908/1909 valuation record for the property.

The Auckland City Council Valuation Roll Database 1908-1909 contains partial transcriptions of entries from the validation rolls and gives the names, addresses, occupations, property and legal descriptions etc. It gives the properties original street number with annotations added later to depict changes to buildings, streets, street names, etc. up to at least 1918/1919 and even 1923 for some parts of the city and incorporated into the map. It also shows the subsequent numbering of a property.

You can also browse the map. Browsing is on the index sheet of the 1908 map. Each populated grid square represents a sheet of the map. Moving your mouse over the grid highlights a section of the map and clicking on it takes you straight into the map on the database. Aside from the location of a property the map highlights the location and position of streets, footpaths, tramways, post and telegraph fixtures etc throughout the city as it was in 1908.


The City of Auckland 1908 map, whether you have connections to that part of Auckland or not, is a wonderful resource to search just out of interest to see the Auckland of over 100 years ago.


Bridget

Talented Tuesday: Colleen Fitzpatrick, forensic genealogy - video presentations online

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Colleen Fitzpatrick, forensic genealogist and author
On 20 April, 2015, we were extremely fortunate to have Colleen Fitzpatrick PhD, visiting forensic genealogist and author from the US, come and speak for us at Central Library.

Colleen is a nuclear physicist, who is a consultant in some high profile cases that involve using both genetic and forensic genealogy to solve a case. 

She has a really impressive CV.

Colleen is also the author of 


Colleen is a talented researcher and an excellent speaker with a wide choice of subjects to choose from and has a real talent for making the complicated and the technical both easily understood and entertaining.

Fortunately, her visit to us coincided with our "pilot" scheme and we were able to video her talks which you can find here on our website.

The presentations she gave us were:

CSI meets Roots
Forensic genealogy has established itself as the modern approach to family research. Reference materials such as photographs, databases, and DNA can provide much more information than you ever dreamed. But are you really using your genealogical materials to your best advantage? The goal of this talk is to spark your imagination to discover new ways of looking at your family mysteries.

Adoption searches
This talk will give you insight into adoption searches – how to use explicit and implicit information in conjunction with DNA to locate someone even if don’t know his or her name.

The "Unknown Child" of the Titanic - identified?
Of the 328 bodies recovered by the salvage operation of the SS Titanic, just one was that of a child. His identity was unknown for nearly a century until 2002, when Dr. Alan Ruffman and Dr. Ryan Parr announced that they had identified the remains of the “Unknown Child”. But was this identification correct? How was the controversy resolved so that the Unknown Child of the Titanic was unknown no longer.

So make yourself a cup of tea, sit down for an hour or two and enjoy!

Happy watching

Seonaid




Census Sunday: 1911 suffragette evaders

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By 1911 New Zealand women had voting rights for nearly two decades, while their UK sisters still battled for their rights and a voice.  The Women's Freedom League incited members with its Manifesto to " … oppose, hamper, destroy if possible, the power of an unrepresentative Government to govern women, refuse to be taxed, boycott the Census, refuse all official information until women have won that which is their absolute right – the right of a voice and vote."

Women and the vote, 1914.
Sir George Grey Special Collections,
Auckland Libraries, AWNS-19140416-48-6
The Women's Freedom League initiated a boycott of census day, Sunday 2 April 1911, to protest their lack of rights to vote. These suffragette evaders refused to have their names added to their own household registers, effectively 'vanishing' from the census while many left their homes for the day. 

Evaders such as Louisa Burnham defiantly wrote the words "No vote, no census. If I am intelligent enough to fill in this census form I can surely make a X on a ballot paper" across the schedule.











1911 Census of England,
 RG 14/2277/362 [Ancestry]



1911 Census of England,
RG 14/152 [Ancestry]
So, if you have been looking for a female family member and she is mysteriously missing from the 1911 Census of England and Wales, perhaps she too made a stand and boycotted.

Auckland Libraries has recently added two new books on the subject to the collection and there are borrowable copies.



Women and the vote : a world history by Jad Adams, 2014.

Vanishing for the vote : suffrage, citizenship and the battle for the census by Jill Liddington, 2014.

Karen
Central Auckland Research Centre

Treasure Chest Thursday: Huguenots

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Do you have Huguenot ancestors? 

Yes? Then you will be interested to know that we added these new 
CD-ROMS to the family history collection this week. 

1 GEN REL HUG    Huguenot Families Numbers One to Twenty
4 ENG REL HUG   Consistory and Administrative Records c. 1560-1660
4 ENG REL HUG    Reg. of the French Church of Threadneedle St, London
4 ENG REL HUG    Reg. of the French Churches of La Patente & Saint Jean, Spitalfields
4 ENG REL HUG    Reg. of the French Churches of the Cities of London &  Westminster & of Spitalfields

4 ENG REL HUG    Reg. of the Walloon & Huguenot Churches of Canterbury, Bristol, Plymouth, Southampton & Stonehouse
4 ENG REL HUG    Reg. of the Walloon & Huguenot Churches of Norwich, Colchester, Thorney & Thorpe-le-Soken
4 IRL REL HUG      Reg. of the French Churches in Dublin & Portarlington, Ireland
5 EUR REL HUG    Reg. of the French Churches of Guisnes, Cadzand, Dover & Le Mans
6 AAM REL HUG    Naturalizations of Foreign Protestants in the American Colonies

To find more resources in the family history collection, type the word 'Huguenot' in the subject search box of the Classic Catalogue and limit the search to 'Heritage & Research' in the drop down menu.

Good luck with your search!

The Family History Team

Motivation Monday: Announcing the Auckland Family History Expo @ Central City Library

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Auckland Family History Expo @ Central City Library

When: Friday 7 August - Sunday 9 August
Where: Central City Library
Cost: Free for all events, except Friday opening event

The Auckland Family History Expo is a weekend-long event covering a wide range of topics related to genealogy and researching your family history.

A range of exhibitors will have stalls set up throughout the weekend, and a variety of talks on research techniques, resources and tools will be taking places in three separate venues around the library.

See the programme of events for each day:
Friday 7 August - $10, booking instructions below
Saturday 8 August - free, no bookings required
Sunday 9 August - free, no bookings required


Keep an eye out for Auckland War Memorial Museum's interactive Mobile Roadshow Unit, which will be parked outside Central City Library in Lorne Street all day on Friday, Saturday and Sunday.

As always, library staff will be available in the Central Auckland Research Centre to provide research assistance and access to resources.

Exhibitors
  • Ancestry
  • Findmypast
  • FamilySearch
  • Archives New Zealand
  • Auckland War Memorial Museum and WW100
  • The Guild of One-Name Studies
  • The NZ Fencible Society
  • Hooked on Genealogy and Beehive Books
  • Anglican Archives
  • Kresy-Siberia Virtual Museum
  • The New Zealand Society of Genealogists and its interest groups: New Zealand, Australian, Scots, Irish, English, European, Huguenot, Pacific Island and Māori.

FRIDAY
Family History Expo opening
Whare Wananga Level 2, 4pm - 8pm

Attendance will cost $10 to cover hospitality. Booking is essential given that limited seats are available. To reserve your place, email the Central Auckland Research Centre or phone 09 307 7771.

4pm-5pm: Welcome and opening, followed by panel discussion
Featuring Michelle Patient (Guild of One-Name Studies), Ben Mercer (Ancestry), Seonaid Lewis (Auckland Libraries), Helen Smith (Genealogical Society of Queensland), Gay Williams (New Zealand Society of Genealogists).
5pm: Light refreshments
6pm: All is not lost - keynote address by David Lomas (Missing Pieces, Lost & Found)
For many New Zealand families there is a missing piece. All is not lost, presented by journalist David Lomas, will look at how missing people are found by David and his fellow researchers on the TV3 programme Lost & Found and its predecessor Missing Pieces.



SATURDAY
Whare Wananga, Level 2 (seminars)  
10.15am: Commemorating the 1918 Flu Pandemic
Discovering insights from the online collections. Introduction by Sandra Coney (Auckland Council), presentation by Ben Mercer (Ancestry.com), Topics will include Births, Deaths & Marriages; NZSG Cemeteries Collection; the special place of Waikumete Cemetery; and preparing for the centenary in 2018.
11.15am: AncestryDNA and your family tree
Combining history with science, making connections online with Ben Mercer (Ancestry.com.au). Topics will include the AncestryDNA toolkit, building your family tree, breakdown of ethnicity, and making connections online.
12.15pm: Heraldic treasures at the Auckland War Memorial Museum library
Join manuscript librarian Martin Collett and learn about heraldry and the treasures within the Auckland Museum Library. 
1.15pm: They went to Australia and now can't be found
Presented by Helen Smith, Genealogical Society of Queensland.
2.15pm: FamilySearch
Learn how to use this wonderful free website to assist you with your family history. Presented by Jan Gow, Hooked on Genealogy.
3.15pm: The rest of the iceberg: researching beyond the internet
Presented by Barbara Wyley, NZSG.


Te Marama Room, Level 1 (workshops)
10.30am: Getting started with your family history research
Presented by Jan Gow, Hooked on Genealogy.
11am: DNA basics
A beginner’s guide to how science can help your family history by Helen Smith, Genealogical Society of Queensland.
11.30am: Tips for carrying out a family history interview 
Presented by Sandra Metcalfe, NZSG.
12noon: FindMyPast A-Z
Hints and tips for making the most of your Findmypast searches. Presented by Fiona Brooker, Findmypast.
12.30pm: Researching your Huguenot family history
Presented by Marion Heap, NZSG.
1pm: Researching in the Pacific Islands 
Presented by Christine Liava'a, NZSG Pacific Island Interest Group.
1.30pm: Kresy-Siberia Virtual Museum
The Kresy-Siberia Virtual Museum deals in the Eastern Borderlands of Poland during WWII and, in particular, the Soviet occupation of the area and deportations of Poles to Siberia. Presented by Irena Lowe, Kresy-Siberia Virtual Museum.
2pm: Beginner's guide to researching your NZ family history 
Presented by Elaine Bell, NZSG research office holder.
2.30pm: Researching your Australian family history 
Presented by Helen Smith, Genealogical Society of Queensland.
3pm: Researching your Irish family history
A beginners guide presented by Maureen West, Auckland Libraries.
3.30pm: Building FamilyTrees with FamilySearch
Presented by Sister Lynda Bennett, FamilySearch.


Akozone computer suite, Level 1
Hands on computer tutorials
11am: Family history eResources at Auckland Libraries
Learn to use Auckland Libraries' online resources with Marie Hickey, Auckland Libraries.
12pm: FamilySearch NZ/AU
Tips and tricks on using FamilySearch to find New Zealand and Australian records, presented by Jan Gow, Hooked on Genealogy.
1pm: Ancestry NZ/AU
Tips and tricks on using Ancestry to find New Zealand and Australian records presented by Christine Clement, Ancestry.
2pm: Findmypast NZ/AU
Tips and tricks on using Findmypast to find New Zealand and Australian records presented by Fiona Brooker, Findmypast.



SUNDAY
Whare Wananga, Level 2 (seminars)
10.15am: Present, Past and Future - with Findmypast
Discover how Findmypast can help you trace your family history with Fiona Brooker, Findmypast.
11.15am: Māori Land Court Minute Books
Whakapapa is found throughout the Minute Books – come and learn how to use them. Presented by Raniera Kingi, Auckland Libraries.
12.15pm: NZ Society of Genealogists
An outline of who we are, and what we can offer to all family history historians. Presented by Gay Williams, NZSG President.
1.15pm: Special settlement schemes
Includes schemes such Albertland, Puhoi, and the Bay of Islands settlements. Presented by Mark Stoddart, Archives NZ.
2.15pm: Scotland's People
The very best thing your ancestors could have done for you is be born, married or died in Scotland. Presented by Jan Gow, Hooked on Genealogy.
3.15pm: Digging for treasure
Using online newspapers to research your family’s history, presented by Michelle Patient, Guild of One-Name Studies.

Te Marama Room, Level 1 (workshops)
10.30am: How to do a One-Name Study
Presented by Michelle Patient, Guild of One-Name Studies.
11am: Timelines for brickwall research
Presented by Helen Smith, Genealogical Society of Queensland.
11.30am: Read all about it
Use newspapers and magazines to enhance your family and social history research. Presented by Marie Hickey, Auckland Libraries.
12pm: Q & A - what would you like to know about researching your family history?
Ask your local NZSG reps.
12.30pm: Researching your English family history
Presented by Viv Parker, NZSG.
1pm: Researching your Scottish family history
Presented by Marie Hickey, Auckland Libraries.
1.30pm: Starting your German family history 
Presented by Graham Clark, NZSG European Interest Group.
2pm: Whakapapa research with Auckland Libraries
Are you thinking about starting your whakapapa journey? Come along to this session and make a start today. Presented by Raniera Kingi, Auckland Libraries.
2.30pm: Evernote for Genealogists
Evernote is an easy-to-use flexible tool which not only stores notes (text, sound, images and handwriting) but makes them easy to find. Presented by Michelle Patient, Guild of One-Name Studies.
3pm: Headlines or smallprint
Add some flesh to the bones of your family history with these search tips. Presented by Fiona Brooker, Findmypast.
3.30pm: Ancestry search tricks
Presented by Christine Clement, Ancestry.

Akozone computer suite, Level 1
Hands on computer tutorials
11am: Ancestry UK
Tips and tricks on using Ancestry to find records to assist with research in the UK and Ireland. Presented by Christine Clement, Ancestry.
12pm: Auckland Libraries Family History eResources
Learn to use Auckland Libraries' unique online resources with Seonaid Lewis, Auckland Libraries.
1pm: Findmypast UK
Tips and tricks on using Findmypast to find records to assist with research in the UK and Ireland. Presented by Fiona Brooker, Findmypast.
2pm: FamilySearch UK
Tips and tricks on using FamilySearch to find records to assist with research in the UK and Ireland. Presented by Jan Gow, Hooked on Genealogy.

See the Auckland Libraries' website for more details


Treasure Chest Thursday:- Māori Land Court Minute Books - Part 2: Searching

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To search the minute books you will need to use the Māori Land Court Minute Book Index. This index was created in the 1990s by librarians at the University of Auckland. The index covers 1,100 minute books from the whole country for hearings held between 1865-1910.

The index is available via two platforms. Either through Knowledge Basket, which Auckland Library members can access via the Digital Library, or through DBTextworks.

Auckland Library members can search the DBTextworks version on pcs at the Central Auckland Research Centre, the South Auckland Research Centre and the West Auckland Research Centre. We recommend using the DBTextworks version if possible as it enables specific field searching, the results can be easier to interpret and you can utilise the ‘browse feature’ to look up terms used in the index (helpful if you are unsure of spellings etc).

The index does not contain the content of the minute books themselves, so you will need to note the district, bookname and page numbers to then refer to the appropriate hard copy or microfilmed minute book. The hard copies can sometimes be easier to read than the microfilmed versions. Also, multiple volumes can be included on one reel of microfilm; each volume is only indicated at the start of that volume - which can make finding the appropriate volume and page more difficult.

When searching, you would usually be using some of the following information:

  • Names of land blocks
  • Names of people who may have given evidence in court between 1865-1910 or died before 1910
  • Names of hapū or iwi who may have been mentioned in court between 1865-1910

Other possibilities include date, place of sitting, judge, type of case or district.




This screenshot shows a search for succession cases on the Wairoa block involving Wiremu Kauika, using the Advanced Search:

Note that the database uses the surname, first name format. Eg Kauika, Wiremu

As is often the case when database searching, ‘less is more’, and it may be appropriate to include search information in only one field; sometimes just searching on a surname is sufficient. If you get too many irrelevant results than you can add more information to narrow your search.

A useful tip for name searching which accommodates the fact that names may have been recorded in the minute books in different orders, is to use the ‘within’ operator. Eg a search for Wiremu W2 Kauika will find all records where ‘Wiremu’ is within two words of ‘Kauika’ (in either order) allowing for an intervening middle name.


This screen shot shows this search, using Basic Search:

In terms of whakapapa research, when you review your search results the following information fields in the index’s records are particularly important:

KAIKŌRERO: Witnesses and conductors (kaiwhakahaere). These are the people who stood up to speak. They are listed in order of appearance.

HAPŪ: Hapū listed may be connected with the block of land, with the witnesses giving the evidence or frequently mentioned in the text.

NOTES: Page numbers for judgements, lists of owners etc in longer cases and other miscellaneous information. Note that information on tamaiti whāngai may be included here (a child adopted informally in terms of tikanga Māori and brought up as the adopting parent’s own child without formal adoption being concluded by any court).

WHAKAPAPA: Person giving whakapapa of more than 20 names

TIPUNA: First name or names listed at the top of the whakapapa table

TANGATA: Deceased person (eg in succession cases), adoptee, minor etc

WHAKPAGE: Page numbers for whakapapa

Here is an example of a record found by the above search.

The minute books indexed for 1890-1910 are especially rich in detailed whakapapa, including lists which can spread over 5-10 pages.

The following is also useful to note (adapted from the Comprehensive Search Guide):

Whakapapa containing more than 20 names have been indexed by the name of the person reciting the whakapapa, and by the name or, occasionally names, of the tipuna at the top of the whakapapa. In the Advanced Search, use the Tipuna/Ancestor field box to search for person reciting whakapapa and for tipuna.

It is also possible to find whakapapa without having a specific name to search. To do this, you will need to change the query screen to one which includes a box for each indexed field in the database. In the top menu choose Search > Select Query Screen > Basic Query Screen Type >0 in the Whakapapa field box. This will find all cases containing whakapapa. You can narrow this to a specific hapū or place using the Hapū or Place fields. For example, a search for all cases containing whakapapa for the hapū Ngarauru results in 27 records.

Cases containing many short whakapapa of less than 20 names have been noted with the phrase "short whakapapa" in the Notes field. 

When searching for names, it is important to try spelling variants:

Spelling - if a search doesn't find any records, or if you want to be sure you have found all the records about a particular person, try variations in spelling, eg Tamehana or Tamihana. Because the minute books are often difficult to read, the name may not have been spelled correctly. Try substituting e for i, a for u , n for ri etc. Taria and Tana for example, can look very similar. You can also use Browse choices from the Edit menu to browse through all the names in the index. Truncation, using the * and the first few letters of the name is another useful strategy. (eg a search for Rangi* finds every name beginning with Rangi including Rangiwhakaoma, Rangipaia, Rangiwhenua etc.) Remember, too, that names may be spelt with double vowels eg Hori or Hoori. 

When you are searching the Index, the Auckland University’s Quick Search Guide is useful to refer to. If more detail is required and for extensive background notes, see their Comprehensive Search Guide, although note that there have been some functionality changes since these guides were produced.

The minute books themselves run up to 1975. For 1911 onwards (beyond the computerised index) there are a couple of options for searching:

Indexes within the minute books themselves. Each minute book (with the exception of some very early ones) has a ‘block index’, usually at the start of the book, occasionally at the end. Most minute books also have a ‘succession index’ indexing succession orders by the name of the deceased. Note that Māori names are entered under their first name in this index.

Printed indexes. These are available for the years 1865-1900, 1900-1962 and 1962-1975, however the information contained in the indexes is limited to: names of the minute books, the dates and location of sittings, and (for the later period) the names of the judges. The printed indexes are held by the relevant District Offices and a small number of libraries (including Auckland Libraries for the 1865-1900 and 1900-1962 indexes) and also Archives New Zealand.

In addition to the Māori Land Court Minute Books there are many other resources for whakapapa research; see Auckland Libraries’ suggested resources.

Your whakapapa is taonga. 
Treat it with respect and it will 
enrich your life and the life of those who come after you.
(Roberts, 2006)


Part 1 of this post covered the background to the Māori Land Court Minute Books.

References
Roberts, Jude (2006). ‘Layer upon layer: Whakapapa’. 

Rachel, Reference Librarian - Heritage

With assistance kindly provided by: 
Robert Eruera, Senior Librarian Pou Ārahi Taonga
Raewyn Paewai, Senior Librarian Māori Research
Linda Hogan, Librarian – Research
I would also like to acknowledge the talk on this subject given by Margaret Ngaropo, former Pou Kohinga Matua

Tuesday's Tip: NEW Family History video presentation available online

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We've had a sudden release of family history videos published to our website - packed full of loads of tips for this Tuesday!

New online:

Colleen Fitzpatrick: The "Unknown Child" of the Titanic - identified?

20 April 2015
Of the 328 bodies recovered by the salvage operation of the SS Titanic, just one was that of a child. His identity was unknown for nearly a century until 2002, when Dr. Alan Ruffman and Dr. Ryan Parr announced that they had identified the remains of the “Unknown Child”. But was this identification correct? Hear how we resolved the controversy so that the Unknown Child of the Titanic was unknown no longer.


Exploring Online Cenotaph with Victoria Passau

15 April 2015
New Zealanders have served this country in many international conflicts. Online Cenotaph, created by Auckland War Memorial Museum, aims to commemorate the stories of these veterans. This session showcases the new Online Cenotaph and discusses how family members and private researchers can contribute.


'The three uncles' The Cole brothers in the Great War with Tina Blackman

15 April 2015
An in-depth look at how the First World War affected one family where four brothers went to the Western Front and only one survived. In Tina Blackman's book, The three uncles: the Cole brothers in the Great War, readers will discover an extraordinary story that will resonate with many whose families were touched by the First World War.


Still to come: Colleen Fitzpatrick’s other two talks from 20 April:- CSI Roots and Adoption searches.

This will bring us to the end of our pilot programme of recording family history talks at this stage.

Family History Talks Online

See Auckland Libraries website for family history events, including the Auckland Family History Expo and other happenings during New Zealand Family History Month in August.


Amanuensis Monday:- Māori Land Court Minute Books - Part 1: Background

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The Māori Land Court minute books are a very important resource for whakapapa research. They are also valuable for local history, early Māori history, and Waitangi Tribunal research.

“Whakapapa literally means the ‘laying down of generations’ layer upon layer. Whakapapa is about people, it is a link to tūpuna, to heritage, to identity. For Māori it is a taonga, and for many it is also tapu. Traditionally whakapapa was handed down orally to a member of the whānau deemed appropriate to look after the whānau whakapapa.” (Paewai, 2015, p2).

The Native Land Court (renamed Māori Land Court in 1947) was established in 1865 with the purpose of translating customary Māori land ownership into legal land titles recognisable under English Law.
Traditional Māori land rights involved communal ownership of land. The hapū (sub tribe) or iwi (tribe) had to prove their traditional rights to land on the basis of occupation, conquest, or ancestry. The gifting of land was also taken into account. Occupation was symbolized by the term "ahi kaa" meaning "to keep the home fires burning". This meant that the hapū had to establish their genealogical connections as well as their physical and emotional ties to a piece of land… When an owner of Māori land dies it is necessary for the person or persons succeeding to that land, to prove their entitlement or right of succession. To do this they must present their whakapapa to the Māori Land Court. (Paewai, 2015, p6).
The Māori Land Court is still in operation, and is organised by seven districts: Taitokerau, Waikato-Maniapoto, Tairāwhiti, Waiariki, Aotea, Tākitimu, and Waipounamu. View maps and details of district offices. Current ownership of Māori land can be searched through Māori Land Online.
As Māori were brought before the court to determine native land entitlements and ownerships, the oral traditions of Māori citing their relationship to the land and the ancestors of it were recorded in the historical minute books. These recitals provide a profound insight into the heritage of the land and the people referred to. (Clement, 2012)
Page from Kaipara Minute Books (Taitokerau Court) Volume 2
3 Sept 1866 - 9 March 1871

The original minute books are held by the Māori Land Court. Photocopied or microfilmed versions are held elsewhere, including some large public and tertiary libraries and branch National Archives offices.

In recognition of their value as a unique archival resource and taonga Māori, in 2012 the minute books were listed in UNESCO’s New Zealand Memory of the World documentary heritage register.

It should be noted that there are four types of minute books:
  • District minute books
  • Judges / Commissioners minute books
  • Appellate minute books (appeals were held by a special Native Appellate Court from 1894 onwards)
  • Papatipu / Papatupu minute books – these are held in district offices only. District offices also hold additional records (block order files, application files, correspondence files, whakapapa files and nominal indexes for owners of land)

Auckland Libraries holds the following minute books:
  • Auckland Central Research Centre – all districts on microfilm, hardcopies of the following minute books: Northern, Auckland, Hauraki, Ōrākei, Kaipara, Mahurangi, Taitokerau, Waikato 
  • South Auckland Research Centre – all districts on microfilm
  • West Auckland Research Centre – all districts on microfilm, all districts in hardcopy
  • North Auckland Research Centre – hard copies of the following minute books: Auckland, Kaipara, Mahurangi and Ōrākei

None of these collections are totally complete, some books were missed in the digitisation process, and some of the original Māori Land Court minute books are missing.

It is important to acknowledge that the processes around applying for Native Land Court title were complex and problematic, and some of the content in the minute books is controversial and subject to dispute. The rush from the Crown to individualise title resulted in errors, and representations were sometimes received from those without a genuine mandate. See Te ture – Maori and legislation and Background to the Māori Land Court minute books for further information.


Part 2 of this post will cover searching the Māori Land Court minute books.

References
Clement, Christine (2012). ‘Discovering Māori links. Inside History, Jan/Feb, p42-44.
Paewai, Raewyn (2015) ‘Whakapapa for Beginners’. [Handout produced for Auckland Libraries’ workshops and customer use.]

Rachel, Reference Librarian - Heritage

With assistance kindly provided by:
Robert Eruera, Senior Librarian Pou Ārahi Taonga
Raewyn Paewai, Senior Librarian Māori Research
Linda Hogan, Librarian – Research
I would also like to acknowledge the talk on this subject given by Margaret Ngaropo, former Pou Kohinga Matua