Guest post: Getting more from the internet


Guest contributor: Marie Hickey

We have recently received the Christmas 2011 issue of Who do you think you are? Magazine in the Central Auckland Research Centre. I always enjoy reading this magazine as there is usually something of interest and this issue is no different as it is “chocca block”  with interesting articles.
There are explanations of the nursing records which have gone on line at www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/documentsonline/nursing.asp and the Irish prison records 1790-1920 which are now on line at www.findmypast.ie. While the latter is a subscription database you can search the index for free but will have to pay to view the record. As is usual with this time of the year, there is a round up of 50 essential websites which include the “usual suspects” but there is mention of others which you may be unaware of, as well as information on new items to come available on the sites in the coming year. It is just so easy to become absorbed with the data on some of these sites.
I am the first to admit that I don’t use the internet to my best advantage so the article “Get more from the internet” was very helpful for me as it gives a number of tips and tricks which makes searching on the internet much easier. While on the subject of the internet, there is an article about the new British Library newspaper site and digitisation project. Postal workers records were published on ancestry.com last year which was great for those of us with Post Office ancestors so the article on postal workers should be of interest to you. 
Got a shop-keeper/worker in the family? There is a bit about some websites that may be useful.
Just as a short postscript, if you have ancestors in London, you will be interested to know that the London electoral rolls 1835-1965 were published on ancestry.com last week. In the main, these only give the name of the person, their address and qualification to vote. However, in some circumstances you get information about rent paid, to whom, whether or not the flat was furnished and where in the building it is eg 2nd floor at front – all useful information if you can get it.
As I say, this issue was a really good read. We have a non-borrowable copy in the Central Auckland Research Centre but you may be able to borrow a copy from another library alternatively, it should be available in the shops here probably next month but do check with your local magazine shop about this.

Marie Hickey

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